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It makes the car safer feeling (less sway) in the turns . Maybe a spring kit without Mag. ride could be BETTER !! I wonder if there are different spring kits for Mag ride/non Mag.ride ?? :confused:
 

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When I test drove the R8 it did make a big difference. We also have this option on our Corvette (I think it was one of the first cars to employ this technology) and it is the nicest riding vette I've ever driven.
 

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It makes a big difference in the feel of the car in turns. It is nice that they did not make the car ride like it was on all the time. This way you have comfort when you are just driving around, but stiffness and feel when you want it. It should be standard on all R8s, not an option.
 

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By the way - I believe this is standard equipment on the 2010 models for both the V8 and V10.
 

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My old timer freind says he read about Mag. Shock oil over 30 years ago in a magazine called Mechanics Illustrated .I guess it was just a concept back then ??
 

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I think its first use in a production car was by Ferrari but I could be wrong.
I think Colin Chapman, an automotive genius right up there with Harry Miller and Ferdinand Porsche, did the early development work on active suspension with processor control....and I think Lotus had some prototypes at one time.

I think the idea of magnetic/rheological shocks had been out there for a long time (even before the practicability of computer control) but Delphi (GM) I think had the first practical applications: Cadillac and Corvette. Daimler Benz had some different approaches to active suspension I think.
 

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The first car I had with active suspension was a Mercedes SL55 which uses a computer controlled hydraulic system. It detects squat, dive, yaw, roll, speed and steering position amongst other things in order to adjust the damper rates.

The magnetic fluid systems, as I understand it, use the same type of inputs but can react much faster as the fluid does not have to be moved or pressurised.

And a quick google reveals that you are right, Delphi had it first !
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Thanks for all the info guys. Im afraid its too late now, im suppose to receive mine within 3 weeks or so. Hope our friend DailyDriver is right because i've seen the latest order guide and it states that magnetic ride is standard.
 

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I think Colin Chapman, an automotive genius right up there with Harry Miller and Ferdinand Porsche, did the early development work on active suspension with processor control....and I think Lotus had some prototypes at one time.

I think the idea of magnetic/rheological shocks had been out there for a long time (even before the practicability of computer control) but Delphi (GM) I think had the first practical applications: Cadillac and Corvette. Daimler Benz had some different approaches to active suspension I think.
I thought I remembered Chevy/GM boasting about this being new at the time. I found this article: http://www.theautochannel.com/news/2002/11/09/150285.html
DETROIT - November 8, 2002; Popular Science magazine has named General Motors' Magnetic Ride Control the winner of its prestigious "Best of What's New" award in the Automotive Technology category for 2002.

The award recognizes products or technologies that represent a significant step forward in the category. GM's Magnetic Ride Control, the worlds fastest reacting suspension system, took vehicle handling to a new level with the introduction of this leading-edge technology on the 2002 Cadillac STS. It is now also available on the 2003 Chevrolet Corvette.
 
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