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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just took delivery of a new 997 Turbo with ceramic brakes. High speed braking is absolutely stunning, but at low speeds (in town, etc) they are snatchy and very sensitive to pedal pressure, almost to the point of being irritating!

I'm waiting on a new R8, also with ceramic brakes. Any of you out there with this option on your R8's find the same problem? Especially as Audi brake pressure is very light compared to Porsche to begin with!
 

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I just took delivery of a new 997 Turbo with ceramic brakes. High speed braking is absolutely stunning, but at low speeds (in town, etc) they are snatchy and very sensitive to pedal pressure, almost to the point of being irritating!

I'm waiting on a new R8, also with ceramic brakes. Any of you out there with this option on your R8's find the same problem? Especially as Audi brake pressure is very light compared to Porsche to begin with!
Not many R8 owners have them. They weren't available in the US and I'm not sure they were easy to get in the EU, but I could be mistaken. In both places, they are pretty **** pricey and I'm sure the normal ones suffice.

I'm guessing that the R8 ceramic will bite just as hard as the 997.
 

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The main upsides of ceramic brakes are they are much lighter (less unsprung weight = better ride and handling), and also are significant better in resisting brake fade during intensive track use.

The downsides are that they are expensive, can give lower pedal feel than steel brakes (making them less easy to modulate), and have had some quality issues (eg Porsche had cracking issues).

I think the steel discs are more than fit for purpose, so have gone with them - though I'm likely to track the car, I'm not going to be racing it, and it's easy to nurse discs. The R8 has massive callipers and discs - the key deteminant of braking performance is the grip level given by tyres.

In my view ceramics are still a few years away from being the right price, and solving the feel issues.
 

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I've gotta agree with James. Since moving to Pagid Blue Pads & Castrol SRF Fluid, the R8 brakes are definately up to the task for serious track days with NO fade. Only problem is the tyres can't slow the car quick enough, so I will be moving to Michelin Pilot Cups.
 

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I've gotta agree with James. Since moving to Pagid Blue Pads & Castrol SRF Fluid, the R8 brakes are definately up to the task for serious track days with NO fade. Only problem is the tyres can't slow the car quick enough, so I will be moving to Michelin Pilot Cups.
Good enough? Bz888 bro, think about the lower unsprung weight and the reduced rotational inertia! the way you drive and track, I'm sure u'll love the ceramic brakes!:cool:
 

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Good enough? Bz888 bro, think about the lower unsprung weight and the reduced rotational inertia! the way you drive and track, I'm sure u'll love the ceramic brakes!:cool:
Agreed my Freind. My V10 will definately have Ceramics! :D BUT, I just wanted to mention that the standard Pirelli OEM tyres struggle to slow the car down on the limit.
 

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When I bought my 997 tt I was told do not buy the ceramic brakes unless you track the car,this was by several of the porsche driving instructors on my 997tt driving experience.
Others I have spoken to have also said the same thing,unless you track the car it really isn't worth it.
 

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I think ceramics are only going to be really useful for serious track use when fade will be a problem and also when the weight issue will also be benificial. In the 997 Turbo I have never had a problem with standard brakes, they scrub off speed very well and around town they are fine too and for my V10 R8 I will be going for standard brakes as I dont intend to track it a great deal. So it all depends what you are planning for the car. Hope this helped, let us know what you decide
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I agree that braking performance on and off track for either steel or ceramic disks will both be awesome, and unless "going for a time", the difference is probably negligible. But as many of you say, one major advantage of the ceramics is lower unsprung weight, if anything to give better ride around town (we have BAD roads in Hong Kong)! The ride in the new 997T with ceramic disks is incredible. If any of you guys fit the ceramics, pls let us know! In the meantime, my car arrives in a few weeks and I'll keep you posted, but I am concerned about the combo of snatchy ceramic disks and temperamental R-tronic!
 

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Ceramic brakes do not work so well when cold. When cold they will not work as well as the R8's stock brakes. They are really made for track use. When hot they are truly wonderful. But when cold, ceramic brakes will also squeak quite abit. I understand that these brakes have become more of a status symbol than just a mechanical part of a car, and probably appear quite tempting in that respect... Good luck. ;)
 

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There's also much less brake dust with ceramics. I have no plans on tracking my car but will consider ceramics as an option for reduced aggravation when washing the wheels!
 

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There's also much less brake dust with ceramics. I have no plans on tracking my car but will consider ceramics as an option for reduced aggravation when washing the wheels!
Seriously! I would get professional detailers in once a month and still be £££££'s in against the cost of ceramics
 

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Good luck finding decent brake pads for ceramics for track use.

There is a large market for swapping out troublesome Porsche GT3 ceramics for steel rotors for track use!
 
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