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The hill-hold function will hold the car on most reasonable slopes but for only 3 seconds - and you're on your own for throttle inputs while engaging the clutch. So anything other than a small incline (to prevent rolling back too quickly after the 3 seconds), still requires a little clutch-throttle dexterity, as it can/will still stall ...
 

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I say learn stick/manual using another car. there's a few stick shift driving school if you want to go that route or if you have extra funds buy a used beater and practice on that. why spend all that money doing a manual conversion on your rsx? you're better off leaving that alone and getting a beater. messing up the clutch/tranny of the r8 will cost you a lot of $$.
 

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Discussion Starter #23
I say learn stick/manual using another car. there's a few stick shift driving school if you want to go that route or if you have extra funds buy a used beater and practice on that. why spend all that money doing a manual conversion on your rsx? you're better off leaving that alone and getting a beater. messing up the clutch/tranny of the r8 will cost you a lot of $$.
yes my Dad was saying that, I'd probably just get a manual RSX to learn on since they're pretty cheap, then use my Auto as a daily. Thank you for your advice man 🙏🏾
 

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So, first of all - congratulations on having great taste in cars. :) The R8 is a very special car, and I have a feeling it'll be sought after for generations.

Next, as a few folks have mentioned above, just make sure you don't get yourself into a financial trap. Cars, let alone exotics, are expensive. Just getting out of college, make sure you have your priorities set. A car can be in the mix, but it should be balanced with the rest of your life goals. The best advice I can give you is to sock away as much cash into investments as possible when you're young. If you have enough cash to buy an R8 as a college grad, then you'll have enough 5 years later, as well. But one of the most important aspects of investing is time - there's no substitute for it. Money takes time to compound in the market.

If you put too much money into a car, it'll be at the expense of growing your wealth. That could mean delaying a home purchase, wedding, kids, or retirement down the road. Again, it's all a balancing act - so just make sure you're doing the math and understand the opportunity costs of buying a car like an R8 versus investing the cash while you're young. Pull out an investment calculator and actually do the math. You may be surprised how that R8 cash grows over 5 - 10 years, no less 15 or 20. Most college aged kids won't spend the time to do this, so they'll fall into pretty well advertised traps that they'll later regret - there's just no way to go back and undo it. So, make sure you really understand the opportunity cost of owning an expensive car so young in life. You're giving up quite a lot more than just the cost of the car.

OK, public service announcement on being financially sound over... onto the car, itself...

No, I wouldn't learn to drive stick on an R8. I learned on an old VW Jetta. Little power, very forgiving, otherwise very "common" driving experience, and few concerns about messing things up. In an R8, you have a fair number of distractions - a lot more power, first off, but also the distraction of driving your "dream car" and not wanting to mess it up. Burning a clutch, grinding gears, or God forbid downshifting into too low a gear for the engine speed and blowing the engine... not things you want to necessarily "learn" (in my view) on an R8.

Like anything in life, learn in a low pressure environment where you're happy to make mistakes - you also learn from those mistakes, remember. Getting comfortable and confident in a low pressure environment (e.g. cheap, old car) will make it that much more enjoyable to drive the R8. Not to mention, if you make a mistake (and you likely will have a few at first), they won't necessarily be expensive mistakes.

Lastly, if you DID choose to learn on the R8, I'd probably take things much slower. While a V8 R8 isn't the most powerful car in the world, it's still a lot of power relatively speaking, and combining a young driver + powerful car + learning to drive stick = higher risk. I have a young son - if I were in your dad's shoes I'd be giving you the same advice. Having your dad teach you sounds like a great bonding experience - I'd just start with an old, cheap car... which is something you could presumably start doing well before 2022, as well! :)
 

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Great advice! However, why can't we simply like a post on this forum?
 

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Discussion Starter #26
So, first of all - congratulations on having great taste in cars.
The R8 is a very special car, and I have a feeling it'll be sought after for generations.

Next, as a few folks have mentioned above, just make sure you don't get yourself into a financial trap. Cars, let alone exotics, are expensive. Just getting out of college, make sure you have your priorities set. A car can be in the mix, but it should be balanced with the rest of your life goals. The best advice I can give you is to sock away as much cash into investments as possible when you're young. If you have enough cash to buy an R8 as a college grad, then you'll have enough 5 years later, as well. But one of the most important aspects of investing is time - there's no substitute for it. Money takes time to compound in the market.

If you put too much money into a car, it'll be at the expense of growing your wealth. That could mean delaying a home purchase, wedding, kids, or retirement down the road. Again, it's all a balancing act - so just make sure you're doing the math and understand the opportunity costs of buying a car like an R8 versus investing the cash while you're young. Pull out an investment calculator and actually do the math. You may be surprised how that R8 cash grows over 5 - 10 years, no less 15 or 20. Most college aged kids won't spend the time to do this, so they'll fall into pretty well advertised traps that they'll later regret - there's just no way to go back and undo it. So, make sure you really understand the opportunity cost of owning an expensive car so young in life. You're giving up quite a lot more than just the cost of the car.

OK, public service announcement on being financially sound over... onto the car, itself...

No, I wouldn't learn to drive stick on an R8. I learned on an old VW Jetta. Little power, very forgiving, otherwise very "common" driving experience, and few concerns about messing things up. In an R8, you have a fair number of distractions - a lot more power, first off, but also the distraction of driving your "dream car" and not wanting to mess it up. Burning a clutch, grinding gears, or God forbid downshifting into too low a gear for the engine speed and blowing the engine... not things you want to necessarily "learn" (in my view) on an R8.

Like anything in life, learn in a low pressure environment where you're happy to make mistakes - you also learn from those mistakes, remember. Getting comfortable and confident in a low pressure environment (e.g. cheap, old car) will make it that much more enjoyable to drive the R8. Not to mention, if you make a mistake (and you likely will have a few at first), they won't necessarily be expensive mistakes.

Lastly, if you DID choose to learn on the R8, I'd probably take things much slower. While a V8 R8 isn't the most powerful car in the world, it's still a lot of power relatively speaking, and combining a young driver + powerful car + learning to drive stick = higher risk. I have a young son - if I were in your dad's shoes I'd be giving you the same advice. Having your dad teach you sounds like a great bonding experience - I'd just start with an old, cheap car... which is something you could presumably start doing well before 2022, as well!
I appreciate the advice especially on the investments part. I haven't really invested in anything as I dont really have the cash for it, but I would definitely like to start, I will have to talk to my parents about that. Also I agree some things are worth waiting for, and as much as I would like the R8 to be my next car, I will probably be better off waiting and learning a manual on something cheap, so I get the hang of it and hopefully by that time I would have saved enough money to outright buy in cash instead of having to finance it. I appreciate all the advice ez 🙏🏾
 

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You are a car guy. It's in your genes. I love that you want to learn how to drive a stick. I'm going to side with the folks telling you to learn on an old car. I taught my three kids on our 7 year old Mini. It has hill assist, and lets off at 3 seconds like the R8. You'll just make your life easier and less stressful if you learn on a beater. Then go have the time of your life in your R8, with confidence.
 

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The hill-hold function will hold the car on most reasonable slopes but for only 3 seconds - and you're on your own for throttle inputs while engaging the clutch. So anything other than a small incline (to prevent rolling back too quickly after the 3 seconds), still requires a little clutch-throttle dexterity, as it can/will still stall ...
 
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