Audi R8 Forums banner

1 - 20 of 31 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
97 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have a couple questions about removal and replacement of the mag ride shocks. (2010 V10) First let me state for the record that I am somewhat mechanically skilled but by no means an expert. I have been digging into this project slowly and methodically so I don’t get in over my head. (Or at least that’s the plan.)

First question. I have removed the front wheel housing liner and have a pretty clear view of the shock and everything. Is there any real need to remove the headlamp and wheel housing liner trim? It doesn’t appear to really open up anything from what I can tell.

Second question. I’m having a really tough time figuring out how to get a breaker bar or anything substantial on the nut that holds the bolt for the top of the shock. There is just a little space to get maybe a wrench or even a crows foot on a breaker bar. But it doesn’t seem like you can turn the nut without running into the top of the shock with the wrench. If I remove the lower nut and bolt first, will that let the shock swing out of the way a little to be able to work on that upper nut and bolt? My concern is that I'm going to need to get some leverage because I'm definitely not strong enough to turn that nut with a basic wrench and my only impact tool is not going to fit anywhere near there.

Third question. Once I remove the shock, do I need to support the suspension elements? In my mind, the whole thing looks like it will just drop and I don’t know if that’s so good for the axle and all those fancy gears and things. Follow up question. Should I have the car in neutral or in gear while I do all this?

I’ve started on the front because it seems like the trickiest. I’m hoping the rears are a little more accessible. If I can do all this without completely screwing it up I plan to send the shocks to the refurbish shop in Poland. If there are other suggestions, I’m open. I’m following the shop manual but I don’t have all the specialized tools that they seem to call for. So kind of figuring it out as I go. Any help is appreciated. Just trying to learn to do something I’ve never done before.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
97 Posts
Discussion Starter #2
Well I've made a little progress on the shock project. I've determined the answer to question 1. I have to remove the plastic pieces including the cowl part that goes across below the windshield. The issue is not that I can't get a wrench in there, it's that the bolt can't get pulled all the way out with the plastic in the way. I'd hoped to not have to dismantle half the car just to pull the shocks, but that looks like what I have to do. This also seems to solve question 2 by default. I also think I've answered the third question because I've removed the lower nut and bolt and the suspension just seems to sit there.

I reviewed the excellent thread on removal of the trunk and that has helped greatly with figuring out the task of removing all the plastic pieces. This project is going in fits and starts due to my overthinking every step which is my way of doing things... :( Also it would appear that I have family obligations, work obligations and any number of other distractions. So hopefully this doesn't become my life's work.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
97 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
One more question. It looks to me like I will need to use a spring compressor to get the shock back in. When I released the lower nut and bolt, the shock is expanded a little so the bolt holes don't match up. I can't really get a good contact point to use a pry bar to push the shock up and into place, so my thinking is that I will need to use the spring compressor to help maneuver things into place.

Does anyone have any actual experience doing this job? Would really appreciate helpful advice so I'm not completely in the dark here.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
97 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Thanks @DaveL. That looks like a mystery to me at the moment. I saw someone's comment to your post of this on the other thread. I'm pretty sure that there's a nut and bolt at the top of the shock, so I'm not sure what they are describing. One thing I do know is that you are supposed to mount the shock and tighten the top nut and bolt to spec. The bottom one gets semi tightened and then you have to lift the wheel bearing housing up to a pre-measured point. Then you tighten to spec. Possibly that tool is the support you use to help raise the wheel bearing housing.

My plan is to use a floor jack with a support on it that will push up the lug bolt guide and raise the whole shebang that way. The support will not be too fancy. Maybe a step up from a piece of 2x3 scrap wood. Or I may go metal if I feel real classy...
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,031 Posts
Thanks @DaveL. That looks like a mystery to me at the moment. I saw someone's comment to your post of this on the other thread. I'm pretty sure that there's a nut and bolt at the top of the shock, so I'm not sure what they are describing. One thing I do know is that you are supposed to mount the shock and tighten the top nut and bolt to spec. The bottom one gets semi tightened and then you have to lift the wheel bearing housing up to a pre-measured point. Then you tighten to spec. Possibly that tool is the support you use to help raise the wheel bearing housing.

My plan is to use a floor jack with a support on it that will push up the lug bolt guide and raise the whole shebang that way. The support will not be too fancy. Maybe a step up from a piece of 2x3 scrap wood. Or I may go metal if I feel real classy...
Good luck with the work
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
97 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Well I had a little time today, so I got the shocks all removed. Once you get all the plastic removed up front, it's pretty easy access. There are a zillion bolts holding all the plastic fender pieces on. They all look alike except for a certain few. So while you are removing the bolts you have to pay attention to a couple and segregate them and mark them so you know where they are supposed to go. This is true on the front and the back. There are even two bolts in back that attache to the bumper cover and each of those is for its specific hole. So even though everything looks alike, it's not, so don't just spin them out and throw them in a can.

The other part that was a real pain was removing the air guides in the back. The best way I could find to attack that was to remove the rearmost part from the rubber fitting and then wiggle and persuade until the front finally comes off. Then it's still a bit of a puzzle to twist it just right so you can get it out of the wheel well. I am definitely not looking forward to trying to get these suckers back in the car. I love how the workshop manual says, "remove air guides". Yeah, simple...

The first front shock I took off was a bit of a learning experience. When I released the lower bolt I let the shock move toward the outside of the upper control arm. That made it so I couldn't lower the shock once I had undone the upper bolt. So I had to pry it over to the inside which had a larger opening and then the shock came out just fine. The second front shock was a breeze once I knew this little trick.

Compared to the front, the rear shocks weren't too bad. Access was a little easier (once I got the stupid air guides out). One oddity I noticed was that the bolts were put on opposite to the illustration in the workshop manual. I got all concerned about this for a while. So I went googling and found some pics and videos that showed the bolts the same way they are in my car. I think they are easier to extract with their current orientation, so maybe it was a change they made in production at some point.

That's all for now. I'm going to pack up the shocks and figure out how to send them to Poland. Then the real adventure begins. Figuring out how to put the whole darn think back together.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,031 Posts
That's all for now. I'm going to pack up the shocks and figure out how to send them to Poland. Then the real adventure begins. Figuring out how to put the whole darn think back together.
This second part of the job is easy-

Installation is the reverse of removal LoL As it says in all the best workshop manuals :confused:

p.s. Don't forget to post the latest price for refurbishing the shocks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
97 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Hey Sonduren. Thanks for posting the video. I hadn't seen that one yet. You will laugh, but I picked up a nice tip from your clip. In all my years of using tools and seeing other people using tools, I have never seen the use of tape on the screwdriver to avoid marring metal surfaces. It's funny because it's so simple and obvious, but I never thought of it. You can be sure that is going into my repertoire.

Meanwhile, the shocks have arrived in Poland, so they will be working their magic. I will probably detail and clean up the opened up areas on the car. I've got to buy new locknuts. I think there are differing schools of thought on whether or not you can reuse locknuts. In this case, I figure spending 10 bucks on new nuts isn't going to break the bank. There are also differing schools of thought on whether or not you need to use a torque wrench to tighten to spec. I know many people just tighten by feel. In my case, I am not as well calibrated as a torque wrench, so I prefer a measured approach.

Lastly, I notice that some of the torx screws that I took out of the fenders had some sort of locktite substance on them. I'm going to see if I can figure out what that was and I will use that when I replace the fenders.

That ought to keep me busy until the refurbished shocks arrive back at my garage.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,031 Posts
Making good progress Sir, keep the posts coming.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
97 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Waiting for my shocks to get back from Poland. Meanwhile, I'm just messing around in the garage, taking care of a couple items while the car is semi pulled apart. A couple people mentioned items on other threads that I thought would bear looking into.

First item was the fact that the hood latches didn't always open on the first push of the button. I had that happen to me once or twice and I figured it was just operator error and didn't think anything of it. So I took this opportunity to spray a little Dri-Lube into the tough-to-reach areas of the latch. Dri-Lube is a dry lubricant that I learned about years ago and I've found it to be really handy on all sorts of items. (There are a bunch of different brand names, so I won't give a specific recommendation.) Then I put a thin layer of white lithium grease on the actual latch part where it contacts the hood fittings. Did a test run and it works very smoothly. I will have to take note if it acts reluctant in the future, but right now, it seems pretty happy.

Second item was the windshield wiper assembly. When I disassembled the plastic to reveal the wiper mechanism, I noticed some black powder, which meant something was grinding something. I cleaned the whole thing up and again used a little shot of Dri-Lube. I also wire brushed the studs that the wipers sit on. I plan to use a little anti-seize when I reinstall the wipers. That will make removal a lot easier next time. And there will be a next time because of the dumb design of covering up the access to the brake fluid reservoir. I've seen the mod that some people have done to improve this access and maybe I'll do that sometime, but not today. Also, noted that the brake fluid looks brand new, which is nice to know.

I also did a little cleanup in some of the nooks and crannies that you really don't have access to when the fenders are on. There are some weird little places on the leading side of the rear wheel wells that manage to collect a little pile of fine dirt. On the left side in particular, there was this pile that I vacuumed out. I had to pick at it because it was sort of hardened. I figured it was a good thing to clear out of there. Might as well not create a birthplace for rust if I can help it.

I bought new lock nuts for the shock bolts, so I think I've got everything I need for when the shocks come back. Now all I can do is wait for the delivery van to show up. Tick Tock Tick Tock....... Weather's finally getting nicer here and my car doesn't have any wheels on it....:(
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,031 Posts
Don't panic, the shocks will arrive.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
97 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
Don't panic, the shocks will arrive.
Well we are getting closer. I got a message that the shocks were finished and tested. But since it is May 1st, it seems as though much of Europe takes a little break. So they won't be shipped until Monday. You would think that people could plan National Holidays with a little more consideration for MY needs... ;)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,031 Posts
Well we are getting closer. I got a message that the shocks were finished and tested. But since it is May 1st, it seems as though much of Europe takes a little break. So they won't be shipped until Monday. You would think that people could plan National Holidays with a little more consideration for MY needs... ;)
They probably wouldn't get delivered on the 4th July either! holidays always interfere :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
97 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
Following up on the shock refurbishment project. I got the shocks back from Nagengast on Friday and put them back in the car over the weekend. Shocks came back packaged well and they looked good. New bushings, rebuilt shocks, new paint on the shocks. I think the springs were left alone, but the rubber that they seat in looked like it was new.

When they quoted me they said 3-5 days fabrication. It took a little longer than that. I think they may have been pretty busy, but it also was right around May 1, which is a big holiday. I can't be too concerned about that, so overall, I'd say the time was probably pretty reasonable considering. Plus I was busy, so I wouldn't have been able to do anything anyway.

Price was quoted as 2285 euro, and that's what they charged me. Broken out it was 490 euro per shock for the refurbishment and then the rest was for shipping and some sort of customs clearance. I wish I knew more about shipping overseas because I paid nearly 900 usd to ship them over and I think they charged 200 euro for shipping them back and we both used UPS. Still, the whole shebang was about 3500 usd total. Which beats the alternative.

As far as the reinstallation there were a couple learning experiences.

When installing the shocks, I needed to use a crowbar to push down on the upper control arm levering it against the bottom of the spring base on the shock. I used a rag on the crowbar to try to minimize scraping the paint on the shock. I used a rubber block on the control arm to get the correct set up. This also is a step that requires an assistant to push the bolt through while I was levering. It's a bit of a dance to muscle the holes to line up.

Next thing that I think is pretty important is that when you are torquing the lower bolts that hold the bottom of the shock, the workshop manual says to lift the wheel to a pre-measured point before torquing the bolts. I did it using a floor jack to lift the lower transverse link. This was pretty easy on the rear. On the front I loaded a pile of bricks into the trunk for weight. Even with that weight, I lifted the front of the car off the lift. It was getting a little scary and fortunately I hit the correct measurement, just as I was about to chicken out.

I couldn't figure out why I had to do that lift to the pre measured point, but I did it, figuring that the engineers had their reasons. Well what I saw is that when you have the axle lifted to the correct point, the coupling rod becomes oriented 90 degrees to the bolt. When the suspension is just hanging there it's at an angle. So if you just tightened with the suspension hanging, you wouldn't actually get the bolt torqued correctly. I have a couple pictures if anyone is vaguely interested. At least, that was the case in the rear. The front was less obvious what it was doing, but I did it just to be on the safe side. I'm a little surprised that the various videos you see of guys popping shocks in their cars tend to gloss over this point. Actually they tend to gloss over the pain of getting that lower bolt in. That was probably the physically hardest aspect of the whole job.

As I expected, reinstalling the air guides for the rear were a pain in the butt. I couldn't figure out how to get the rubber bellows onto the air guide. I even pulled the engine trim to see if I could go in from above. It didn't help. What I eventually figured out is if you can put the bellows on the top of the air guide, then use a screw driver to pry the bottom and a pair of pliers to pull the bellows. It will suddenly pop on like nothing. I screwed around with this for so long that when I finally got it, I couldn't believe it worked and I kept double checking it just to make sure. I also used a little soapy water for lubrication.

So those are the main things that I thought I'd share with the group. It was well worth doing. The car rides like it is brand new again. I'm very happy with going the refurb route. The mag ride is really a great feature and doing the refurb is a great way of taking care of the problem without it breaking the bank. Plus you get to do a bunch of little stuff while you're in there. I'd like to thank the forum as a resource. I discovered Nagangast through the forum. I also have to thank desperado because the workshop manuals are invaluable. I would never have tackled this job without them. Hope this didn't bore you and feel free to ask any questions, I'd be glad to help.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,031 Posts
Excellent write up with some very good tips, happy for you that the end result was well worth it. All you need to do now is buy a used set of magrides, send them to Poland, then you'll have a set ready and waiting for the next time, plus you know how to do the change so it'll be quick.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
518 Posts
Following up on the shock refurbishment project. I got the shocks back from Nagengast on Friday and put them back in the car over the weekend. Shocks came back packaged well and they looked good. New bushings, rebuilt shocks, new paint on the shocks. I think the springs were left alone, but the rubber that they seat in looked like it was new.

When they quoted me they said 3-5 days fabrication. It took a little longer than that. I think they may have been pretty busy, but it also was right around May 1, which is a big holiday. I can't be too concerned about that, so overall, I'd say the time was probably pretty reasonable considering. Plus I was busy, so I wouldn't have been able to do anything anyway.

Price was quoted as 2285 euro, and that's what they charged me. Broken out it was 490 euro per shock for the refurbishment and then the rest was for shipping and some sort of customs clearance. I wish I knew more about shipping overseas because I paid nearly 900 usd to ship them over and I think they charged 200 euro for shipping them back and we both used UPS. Still, the whole shebang was about 3500 usd total. Which beats the alternative.

As far as the reinstallation there were a couple learning experiences.

When installing the shocks, I needed to use a crowbar to push down on the upper control arm levering it against the bottom of the spring base on the shock. I used a rag on the crowbar to try to minimize scraping the paint on the shock. I used a rubber block on the control arm to get the correct set up. This also is a step that requires an assistant to push the bolt through while I was levering. It's a bit of a dance to muscle the holes to line up.

Next thing that I think is pretty important is that when you are torquing the lower bolts that hold the bottom of the shock, the workshop manual says to lift the wheel to a pre-measured point before torquing the bolts. I did it using a floor jack to lift the lower transverse link. This was pretty easy on the rear. On the front I loaded a pile of bricks into the trunk for weight. Even with that weight, I lifted the front of the car off the lift. It was getting a little scary and fortunately I hit the correct measurement, just as I was about to chicken out.

I couldn't figure out why I had to do that lift to the pre measured point, but I did it, figuring that the engineers had their reasons. Well what I saw is that when you have the axle lifted to the correct point, the coupling rod becomes oriented 90 degrees to the bolt. When the suspension is just hanging there it's at an angle. So if you just tightened with the suspension hanging, you wouldn't actually get the bolt torqued correctly. I have a couple pictures if anyone is vaguely interested. At least, that was the case in the rear. The front was less obvious what it was doing, but I did it just to be on the safe side. I'm a little surprised that the various videos you see of guys popping shocks in their cars tend to gloss over this point. Actually they tend to gloss over the pain of getting that lower bolt in. That was probably the physically hardest aspect of the whole job.

As I expected, reinstalling the air guides for the rear were a pain in the butt. I couldn't figure out how to get the rubber bellows onto the air guide. I even pulled the engine trim to see if I could go in from above. It didn't help. What I eventually figured out is if you can put the bellows on the top of the air guide, then use a screw driver to pry the bottom and a pair of pliers to pull the bellows. It will suddenly pop on like nothing. I screwed around with this for so long that when I finally got it, I couldn't believe it worked and I kept double checking it just to make sure. I also used a little soapy water for lubrication.

So those are the main things that I thought I'd share with the group. It was well worth doing. The car rides like it is brand new again. I'm very happy with going the refurb route. The mag ride is really a great feature and doing the refurb is a great way of taking care of the problem without it breaking the bank. Plus you get to do a bunch of little stuff while you're in there. I'd like to thank the forum as a resource. I discovered Nagangast through the forum. I also have to thank desperado because the workshop manuals are invaluable. I would never have tackled this job without them. Hope this didn't bore you and feel free to ask any questions, I'd be glad to help.
Great effort Stärke. Have you driven around on the new ones yet, any noticeable difference?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
97 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
@DaveL. I had thought about getting a spare set, but the springs vary for different cars and years, so I'd have to get a set that would match up with mine. I suppose I can keep an eye out for a set at a good price, but I don't know that I will put in the effort. Hopefully I won't be needing to refurb these anytime soon. But you are right about next time if there is one. I will know how to do it pretty quick. Although I'm so methodical and I always find other little things to fiddle around with, so it probably would take me almost as much time. At least I wouldn't have to curse so much as I don't need to revisit my "learning experiences"...

@Markos. You probably didn't make it through my really long write up. LOL. At the end I did comment on my first driving impressions. I've just taken the car on a short drive. I intentionally drove on some crummy roads to make sure that everything was working correctly. The ride is definitely improved. I was a little amazed that it was so noticeable. The shocks must have been in worse shape than I realized, because I thought the car was pretty good before I refurbed. I used both the relaxed and tightened up settings for the shocks. The relaxed setting is so much better now. I didn't really do any driving where the stiffer setting was valuable. It's a stiffer ride, but I think it would be best suited to performance type driving and I was just doing general driving as a shakedown cruise.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
97 Posts
Discussion Starter #20
I think I figured out how to do pictures on this site, so here is the illustration of the lower bolt and the difference between when the suspension is loaded and when it is just hanging. The loaded suspension has the coupling rod straight up and down. That's the position it should be in when you torque the bolt.

IMG_1352.jpg IMG_1351.jpg
 
1 - 20 of 31 Posts
Top